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By Bryan Heaney, UK Supreme Court Blog, 5 December 2013
On Tuesday November 26, 2013 the Supreme Court heard the appeal in I. A. v Secretary of State for the Home Department. It is an appeal from the Inner House of the Court of Session. The justices that heard the case are Lady Hale and Lords Kerr, Wilson, Hughes and Hodge. The case raises a very...
By Rosalind English, UK Human Rights Blog, 22 November 2013
Ignaoua, R (on the application of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2013] EWCA Civ 1498 A certificate issued by the Home Secretary under Section 2 C of the Special Immigration Appeals Commission Act 1997 (the "1997 Act"), as inserted by Section 15 of the Justice and Security Act 2013...
By S Chelvan, No5 Chambers, 8 November 2013
X, Y, Z v Minister voor Immigratie en Asiel: A missed opportunity or a new dawn? S. Chelvan, Barrister, United Kingdom [1] The Court of Justice of the European Union ('the Court') in the landmark decision of X, Y and Z v Minister voor Immigratie en Asiel, [2] have provided a template from...
By Catherine Taroni, EUtopia Law, 23 October 2013
Context The seminal decision in Zambrano relied upon Article 20 TFEU as a source of residence rights independent of secondary legislation. The CJEU has so far not been willing to extend its application, and Alopka was another failed attempt to rely upon Article 20 TFEU. Background Alopka concerned...
By John Kelly, 18 October 2013
The government's new Immigration Bill will need no introduction to EIN's readers. Criticims have been numerous, with Colin Yeo calling it "sinister and nasty" on Freemovement and Alex Massie branding it a "contemptible piece of legislation" on The Spectator. However...
By Rosalind English, UK Human Rights Blog, 9 October 2013
MF (Nigeria) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2013] EWCA Civ 1192 In what circumstances can a foreign criminal resist deportation on the basis of his right to family life under Article 8 of the Convention? Until 2012 this question was governed entirely by judge-made case law...
By Isabella Sankey, Liberty, 1 October 2013
We’re lucky to live in the world’s oldest unbroken democracy – a land where notions of dignity and fairness are generally treasured. But our justice system isn’t perfect. No justice system is. That’s why appeal rights are so essential – allowing people, as they...
By Nils Muižnieks, 19 September 2013
Migrant children are particularly vulnerable – especially if they are unaccompanied, travelling without parents or relatives. Many have been traumatised and abused before arriving in Europe. They must be met with care and with respect for their rights. Yet, there are many accounts of harsh...
By Professor Robert Thomas, University of Manchester, 12 September 2013
There is much current debate over judicial review, prompted in large part by successive government consultation papers. This note provides an overview of recent developments concerning immigration judicial reviews, which have, for many years, provided the bulk of all judicial review claims. The...
By Sarah Craig, Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network (GRAMNet), 2 September 2013
Language analysis is a tool used by Government decision-makers to "test" the credibility of an asylum seeker's claim, and to assess whether the applicant is being honest about the country they claim to be from. It involves the consideration of a recording of an asylum seeker's...
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About the guest blog

EIN's guest blog is intended as a platform where we gather together some of the best of immigration law blogging. And it is a platform where you can post your opinions, commentary or analysis on immigration and asylum law.

If you're a seasoned blogger, of if you've always wanted to blog but never found an audience, blogging on EIN is a way of ensuring your opinions are available to read on a leading immigration law website.

EIN encourages your blog submissions.

You can send your submissions to us at support@ein.org.uk.

Please include a title for your piece, and please also let us know the name that you wish to appear as the author of the post. This may simply be your full name, but we appreciate that some may wish to post anonymously or under a pseudonym.

Blog submissions should ideally be on the theme of immigration or asylum law, but we're happy to receive submissions on more general immigration topics.



Disclaimer

The EIN guest blog is provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. EIN does not necessarily endorse any of the views expressed by guest bloggers in this section, nor their company, products or services.